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Wednesday, December 30, 2009

Intermountain Railway Company HO Scale AC-12 4-8-8-2 Locomotive - Southern Pacific

Intermountain Railway Company HO 4-8-8-2 AC-12 Locomotive -Southern Pacific #4292


Southern Pacific Railroad's AC-12 class of cab forward steam locomotives was the last class of steam locomotives ordered by Southern Pacific. They were built by Baldwin Locomotive Works during World War II, with the first, number 4275, entering service on October 27, 1943, and the last, 4294, on March 19, 1944.

SP used the AC-12s for a little over a decade with the first retirements occurring on April 5, 1955, and the last on September 24, 1958. All but one of this class, number 4294, was scrapped.

In steam locomotive design, a cab forward design will typically have the driver's compartment placed immediately forward of the firebox at the very front of the engine while the fireman's station remains on the footplate behind the firebox (for obvious reasons). This type of design was widely, though not commonly, used throughout Europe in the first half of the 20th century, often in conjunction with an enclosed body design and/or streamlining.

In contrast however, the best known example of the cab-forward design in the United States, the Southern Pacific Cab-Forward (also known as "Cab-in-fronts") placed the cab at the front by the simple expedient of turning the entire locomotive, minus the tender, by 180 degrees, an arrangement made possible by burning fuel oil instead of coal.

The cab forward design was widely used by the Southern Pacific Railroad, which developed it to deal with the peculiar problems of its routes. The 39 long tunnels and nearly 40 miles (64 km) of snow sheds of the Sierra Nevada Mountains could funnel dangerous exhaust fumes back into the crew compartment of a conventional locomotive. After a number of crews nearly asphyxiated, someone had the idea of running his locomotive in reverse. This meant that the tender was leading the train, which introduced new problems. The tender blocked the view ahead and put crewmen on the wrong sides of the cab for seeing signals. The tenders were not designed to be pushed at the lead of the train, which limited speeds. Southern Pacific commissioned Baldwin Locomotive Works to build a prototype cab-forward locomotive, then ordered more before the prototype had even arrived.

All of the cab-forwards were oil-burning locomotives, which meant there was little trouble involved putting the tender at what would normally be the front of the locomotive. The oil and water tanks were pressurized so that both would flow normally even on uphill grades. Visibility from the cab was superb, such that one crewman could easily survey both sides of the track. There were concerns about what would happen to the crew in the event of a collision, and at least one fatal accident occurred on the Modoc Line when a moving locomotive struck a flat car. Turning the normal locomotive arrangement around also placed the crew well ahead of the exhaust fumes, insulating them from that hazard. One problematic aspect of the design, however, was the routing of the oil lines; because the firebox was located ahead of the driving wheels (instead of behind them, the usual practice), oil leaks could cause the wheels to slip. A nuisance under most conditions, it resulted in at least one fatal accident. This occurred in 1941 when a cab-forward with leaking steam and oil lines entered the tunnel at Santa Susana Pass near Los Angeles. The tunnel was on a grade, and as the slow-moving train ascended the tunnel, oil on the rails caused the wheels to slip and spin. The train slipped backwards and a coupler knuckle broke, separating the air line, causing an emergency brake application and stalling the train in a tunnel that was rapidly filling with exhaust fumes and steam. The oil dripping on the rails and ties then ignited beneath the engine cab, killing the crew.

No other North American railroad ordered cab-forward locomotives. Built to deal with difficult terrain, these remarkable locomotives became an easily recognizable symbol of the Southern Pacific. One example of the type, Southern Pacific 4294, is kept at the California State Railroad Museum in Sacramento, California. It is a 4-8-8-2 locomotive and is the only one to escape being scrapped.

Other AC-12 4-8-8-2 Locomotive Items: Railroading On DVD! - Southern Pacific Cab Forward Collection

Other Southern Pacific Items: Athearn HO Scale SD70M Locomotive - Southern Pacific / Athearn HO Scale AC4400 Locomotive - Southern Pacific / MTH HO Scale GS-4 4-8-4 Locomotive - Southern Pacific/ Bachmann HO Scale 4-8-4 GS-4 Locomotive - American Freedom Train #4449 / Bachmann HO Scale 4-8-4 GS-4 Locomotive - Southern Pacific (War Baby) / Athearn HO Scale C44-9W Locomotive - Southern Pacific / Athearn HO Scale GP40-2 Locomotive - Southern Pacific / Athearn HO Scale Bay Window Caboose - Southern Pacific

Other Intermountain Railway Company Items: Intermountain Railway Company HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Rock Island / Intermountain Railway Company 40ft Box Car - Burlington Northern

Athearn HO Scale SD70M Locomotive - Southern Pacific

Athearn HO Scale SD70M Locomotive - Southern Pacific #9822

Product Features

Researched from the prototype to match specific units
Genesis driveline with dynamically balanced five-pole skew wound motor and dual flywheels
Directional, constant lightling
Working ditch lights
Cab interior


Product Description

Features / / * Researched from the prototype to match specific units / * Genesis driveline with dynamically balanced five-pole skew wound motor and dual flywheels / * Directional, constant lightling / * Working ditch lights / * Cab interior / * Factory installed Celcon handrails / * DCC ready / / Specifications / / DCC: Ready / SOUND: No / PROTOTYPE MANUFACTURER: Electro Motive Division / COUPLER STYLE: McHenry Scale Knuckle / Minimum Age Recommendation: 14 years / Is Assembly Required: No

The EMD SD70 is a series of diesel-electric locomotives produced by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors beginning in 1992. Over 4000 locomotives in this series have been produced, mostly of the SD70M and SD70MAC models. All locomotives of this series are hood units with C-C trucks. All SD70 models up to the SD70ACe and SD70M-2 have the HTCR Radial truck, rather than the HT-C truck; the self-steering radial truck was designed to allow the axles to steer in curves, reducing wear on the wheels and railhead. With the introduction of the SD70ACe and SD70M-2, in an effort to reduce cost EMD introduced a new bolsterless non-radial HTSC truck as the standard truck for these models. The radial truck, now the HTCR-4, is still an option.

The SD70M has a wide nose and a large comfort cab (officially known as the "North American Safety Cab"), allowing more crew members to ride comfortably inside of the locomotive than the older standard cab designs. There are two versions of this cab on SD70M's, the Phase I, which was introduced on the SD60M, and is home on the SD80MAC & SD90MAC's and the Phase II, which made a return to a more boxy design a la the original 3 window SD60M cabs. Though the Phase II cab has a two piece window matching the Phase I cab windows, the lines of the nose are boxy, with a taller square midsection for more headroom. The SD70ACe/SD70M-2 line has what is considered the Phase II cab, but it is actually more so a Phase III cab, as the windows went from the teardrop design to a rectangular window. Like the SD70, the SD70M also uses DC traction motors. Starting in mid-2000, the SD70M was produced with SD45-style flared radiators allowing for the larger radiator cores needed for split-cooling (split-cooling is a feature that separates the coolant circuit for the prime mover and the circuit for the air pumps and turbocharger). There are two versions of this radiator, the older version with two (2) large radiator panels per side, and the newer style with four (4) square panels per side. This was due to the enactment of the EPA's Tier I environmental regulations. Production of the SD70M was replaced by the SD70M-2 in late 2004, as the EPA's Tier II regulations went into effect on January 1, 2005. 1,646 examples of this model locomotive were produced. SD70M models were produced with 4000 horsepower (2,980 kW) EMD Model 710 prime movers. Purchasers included CSX, New York Susquehanna & Western (part of EMDX order #946531), Norfolk Southern, Southern Pacific (now UP), and Union Pacific.

This locomotive model is also built for export, and is still catalogued by EMD (at 4300hp). CVG Ferrominera Orinoco has 6 SD70Ms that were built as an add-on order to UPs FIRE cab equipped SD70Ms. Companhia Vale do Rio Doce (CVRD) in Brazil has ordered 27 of this model for service in Carajas pulling trainloads of iron ore. Since CVRD track is gauged at 1600 mm, a wider bogie, the HTSC2, was designed for these units by EMD.

See Other Southern Pacific Items: Athearn HO Scale AC4400 Locomotive - Southern Pacific / MTH HO Scale GS-4 4-8-4 Locomotive - Southern Pacific/ Bachmann HO Scale 4-8-4 GS-4 Locomotive - American Freedom Train #4449 / Bachmann HO Scale 4-8-4 GS-4 Locomotive - Southern Pacific (War Baby) / Athearn HO Scale C44-9W Locomotive - Southern Pacific / Athearn HO Scale GP40-2 Locomotive - Southern Pacific / Athearn HO Scale Bay Window Caboose - Southern Pacific

Tuesday, December 29, 2009

Bachmann HO Scale Royal Gorge Electric Train Set - Rio Grande

Bachmann Trains Royal Gorge Ready-to-Run HO Train Scale Train Set

Product Features

Powered F7-A and F7-B locomotive
Smooth side coach and Full-dome passenger car
63" x 45" oval of snap-fit E-Z Track
Power pack and speed controller
Illustrated instruction manual


From the Manufacturer

Colorado's oldest scenic line combines rich history, spectacular views and stylish accommodations into a train that takes you on a 24-mile journey through the 1,000 Feet deep Royal Gorge. Passengers travel alongside the Arkansas River on a ribbon of rail for an up-close nature show deep in the canyon, observing bald eagles, blue heron, bighorn sheep, mule deer, and flora native to the gorge.

The Royal Gorge Route Railroad is a heritage railroad located in Cañon City, Colorado.

The railroad transits the Royal Gorge on a 2-hour scenic and historic train ride through the Royal Gorge on what is considered to be the most famous portion of the former Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad. The 1950s-era train departs the Santa Fe depot in Canon City daily.

In the late 1870s miners descended on the upper Arkansas River valley of Colorado in search of carbonate ores rich in lead and silver. The feverish mining activity in what would become the Leadville district attracted the attention of the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad and the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway, each already having tracks in the Arkansas valley. The Santa Fe was at Pueblo and the D&RGW near Canon City, Colorado, some 35 miles west. Leadville was over 100 miles away. For two railroads to occupy a river valley ordinarily was not a problem, but west of Canon City was an incredible obstacle - an obstacle that would result in a war between the railroads in the race to the new bonanza.

West of Canon City the Arkansas River cuts through a high plateau of igneous rocks forming a spectacular steep-walled gorge over a thousand feet deep. At its narrowest point shear walls on both sides plunge into the river creating an impassible barrier. On April 19, 1878, a hastily assembled construction crew from the Santa Fe began grading for a railroad just west of Canon City in the mouth of the gorge. The D&RG whose end of track was only ¾ of a mile from Canon City raced crews to the same area, but were blocked by the Santa Fe graders in the narrow canyon. By a few hours they had lost the first round in what became a two-year struggle between the two railroads that would be known as the Royal Gorge War.

The D&RG crews tried leapfrogging the Santa Fe grading crews, but were met with court injunctions from the Santa Fe in the contest for the right-of-way. The D&RG built several stone "forts" (such as Fort DeRemer at Texas Creek) upstream in an attempt to block the Santa Fe. Grading crews were harassed by rocks rolled down on them, tools thrown in the river and other acts of sabotage. Both sides hired armed guards for their crews. Rifles and pistols accompanied picks and shovels as tools. The railroads went to court with each trying to establish their primacy to the right of way. After a long legal battle that ended in the U.S. Supreme Court, on April 21, 1879, the D&RG was granted the primary right to build through the gorge that in places was wide enough at best for only one railroad.

The Santa Fe resorted to its larger corporate power and announced it would build tracks parallel to and in competition with the existing D&RG lines. The bondholders of the D&RGW, fearing financial ruin from this threat, pressured the management of the D&RGW to lease the existing railroad to the Santa Fe for a 30-year period. This created a short-lived truce in the struggle. The Santa Fe soon manipulated freight rates south of Denver to favor shippers from Kansas City (over its lines to the east) to the detriment of Denver merchants and traffic over the leased D&RGW lines. During this period the Santa Fe constructed the railroad through the gorge itself. The D&RGW, however, continued construction in areas west of the gorge still trying to block the Santa Fe.

After months of shrinking earnings from their leased railroad, the D&RG management went to court to break the lease. An injunction from a local court restraining the Santa Fe from operating the D&RG on June 10, 1879, sparked an armed retaking of their railroad by D&RG crews - war in earnest in the old west. Trains were commandeered, depots and engine houses put under siege, bullets flew and a few men died. A final peace in the war came after the intervention of the Federal courts, and the railroad "robber baron" Jay Gould who loaned the D&RG $400,000 and announced the intention to complete a rail line in competition to the Santa Fe from St. Louis to Pueblo.

On March 27, 1880, the two railroads signed what was called the Treaty of Boston which settled all litigation, and gave the D&RG back its railroad. The D&RG paid the Santa Fe $1.8 million for the railroad it had built in the gorge, the grading it had completed, materials on hand and interest. The Royal Gorge War was over. D&RGW construction resumed, and rails reached Leadville on July 20, 1880. Passenger train service began in 1880 and continued through 1967. Rio Grande continued freight service through the gorge as part of their Tennessee Pass subdivision until 1989, when the company merged with the Southern Pacific Railroad, and the Southern Pacific name took control of the gorge line. In 1996, the combined company was merged into the systems of the Union Pacific Railroad. The year after Union Pacific purchased Southern Pacific and Rio Grande, the railroad closed the Tennessee Pass line, silencing the tracks in the gorge.

In 1998, the Union Pacific Railroad was persuaded to sell the 12 miles of track through the Royal Gorge in an effort to preserve this scenic route. Two new corporations, the Canon City & Royal Gorge Railroad (CC&RG) and Rock & Rail, Inc. (R&R), joined together to form Royal Gorge Express, LLC (RGX) to purchase the line. Passenger service on the new Royal Gorge Route Railroad began in May 1999. Train movements are still controlled by the Union Pacific’s Harriman Dispatching Center in Omaha, Nebraska.Except for this section of track, the Tennessee Pass line has been dormant.

See Other HO Scale Train Sets: Bachmann HO Scale Pacific Flyer Electric Train Set - Union Pacific / Bachmann HO Scale Rail King Electric Train Set - Santa Fe / Athearn HO Scale Iron Horse Express Electric Train Set - BNSF

See Other Rio Grande Items: Lionel O Scale 4-6-6-4 Challenger Locomotive - Rio Grande / Bachmann G Scale Electric Train Set - Durango & Silverton / Bachmann On30 Scale Electric Train Set - Rio Grande / Atlas HO Scale TM 70T 3-Bay Open Hopper - Rio Grande / Walthers HO Scale 30' GTW Caboose - Offset Coupla - Rio Grande / Bachmann HO Scale 2-6-2 Prairie Locomotive - Rio Grande / Trainline EMD GP9 HO Scale Locomotive - Rio Grande

See Rio Grande Related News Items: Railroad Photo Gallery - Union Pacific GP40-2 1368 (Ex Rio Grande)

Athearn HO Scale F7A/F7B Locomotives - Santa Fe

Athearn HO Scale Ready To Run F7 A/B Locomotives, Santa Fe /Passenger #41L/#41A
Product Features

Fully assembled and ready to operate
B unit is unpowered
Super weight installed for extra traction
Machined RP25 profile metal wheels
McHenry scale knuckle spring couplers installed


Product Description

== Key Features == / / * Fully assembled and ready to operate / * B unit is unpowered / * Super weight installed for extra traction / * Machined RP25 profile metal wheels / * McHenry scale knuckle spring couplers installed / / == Specs == / / * DCC:No / * SOUND:No / * PROTOTYPE MANUFACTURER:Electro Motive Division / * COUPLER STYLE:McHenry Scale Knuckle / * ERA:1940 - Present / * MIN. RADIUS:18" Radius / * Minimum Age Recommendation:14 years / * Is Assembly Required:No

The EMD F7 was a 1,500 horsepower (1,100 kW) Diesel-electric locomotive produced between February 1949 and December 1953 by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors (EMD) and General Motors Diesel (GMD). It succeeded the F3 model in GM-EMD's F-unit sequence, and was replaced in turn by the F9. Final assembly was at GM-EMD's La Grange, Illinois plant or GMD's London, Ontario facility. Although originally promoted as a freight-hauling unit by EMD, the F7 was also used in passenger service hauling such trains as the Santa Fe's El Capitan.

A total of 2,366 cab-equipped lead A-units and 1,483 cabless booster or B-units were built. The F7 was the fourth model in GM-EMD's successful line of F-unit locomotives, and by far the highest-selling cab unit of all time.

Many F7s remained in service for decades, as railroads found them economical to operate and maintain. However the locomotive was not very popular with the yard crews who operated them in switching service because they were difficult to mount and dismount, and it was also nearly impossible for the engineer to see hand signals from his ground crew without leaning way outside the window. As most of these engines were bought and operated before two-way radio became standard on most American railroads, this was a major point of contention. In later years, with the advent of the “GP” type “road switchers”, Fs were primarily used in “through freight” and “unit train” service where there was very little or no switching to be done on line of road.

The F7 can be considered the zenith of the cab unit freight Diesel, as it was ubiquitous on North American railroads until the 1970s (longer in Canada). The F7 design has become entrenched in the popular imagination due to it having been the motive power of some of the most famous trains in North American railroad history.

The F7 replaced the F3, differing primarily in internal equipment (mostly electrical) and some external features. The F7 was eventually succeeded by the more powerful but mechanically similar F9.

Other HO Scale F7 Locomotives: Intermountain Railway Company HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Rock Island / Athearn HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Rock Island / Athearn HO Scale F7A Diesel Locomotive - Burlington Northern / Proto 2000 HO Scale EMD F7A-B Locomotives - Canadian Pacific / Proto 2000 Diesel EMD F7A-B Set Powered - HO Scale - Santa Fe / Walthers HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Santa Fe

Other Santa Fe Items: Lionel O Scale El Capitan Electric Train Set - Santa Fe / Lionel O Scale FT Locomotive - Dummy - Santa Fe / MTH HO Scale 2-10-0 Russian Decapod Locomotive - Santa Fe / Bachmann HO Scale Rail King Electric Train Set - Santa Fe / Athearn HO Scale EMD GP38-2 Locomotive - Santa Fe / Athearn HO Scale PS-2 Covered Hopper - Santa Fe / Athearn 50ft Ice Reefer Box Car - Santa Fe (Scout) / Athearn HO Scale Cupola Caboose - Santa Fe / Athearn HO Scale GP60M Locomotive - Santa Fe / Athearn Genesis F45 HO Scale Locomotive - Santa Fe / Bachmann 2-10-4 Texas HO Scale Locomotive - Santa Fe / Bachmann 4-8-4 Northern Locomotive - HO Scale - Santa Fe / Proto 2000 Diesel EMD F7A-B Set Powered - HO Scale - Santa Fe / Bachmann HO Scale FT Locomotive - Santa Fe / Walthers HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Santa Fe

Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Lionel O Scale El Capitan Electric Train Set - Santa Fe

Lionel O Scale Electric Train Set - El Capitan - Santa Fe

Product Features

Transformer controlled forward, neutral, and reverse operation
TrainSounds sound system with diesel engine revving, diesel horn, bell, squealing brakes, and operator-controlled, multi-part crew dialog
Operating headlight
Front operating coupler
40” x 60” oval of Fastrack


Product Description

The classic FT diesel locomotive, equipped with realistic sounds from the TrainSounds sound system, hurtles down the “Route of the Warbonnets.” Three streamlined passenger cars—two illuminated coaches and an illuminated observation car—follow the westbound locomotive. With the CW-80 Transformer and a loop of FasTrack track, you are ready to run one of the Santa Fe’s best known passenger trains.

SET INCLUDES: • FT locomotive • Two coaches • Observation car • CW-80 Transformer with accessory wire • Three straight FasTrack track sections • Eight curved FasTrack track sections • One straight FasTrack terminal track section • Replacement traction tire • Owner’s Manual • Service Center list • Instruction DVD • Lionel RailRoader Club flyer

El Capitan was one of the named passenger trains of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway. It was the only coach, or chair car (non-Pullman sleeper) train to operate the Santa Fe main line from Chicago, Illinois to Los Angeles, California on the same fast schedule as the road's premier Pullman Super Chief.

This all-coach, streamlined train (assigned Nos. 21 & 22) began operations in February 1938. Not unlike the Pennsylvania Railroad's Trail Blazer, it offered "low-cost passage with high-speed convenience." Originally conceived as the Economy Chief, the name El Capitan was ultimately chosen to honor the Spanish conquistadors and their influence on Southwestern culture, though it didn't hurt that the name seemed to outrank the Union Pacific's Challenger all-chair train, with which it was designed to compete. Unique in charging an extra-fare despite being a coach train, it pioneered such features as "RideMaster" seating optimized for sleeping. The original consists were two new Budd Company-built trains of five cars each made of lightweight stainless steel. Each of the two luxury trains were capable of accommodating 188 passengers for a mere $5.00 upcharge over the price of a ticket on the road's all-chair Scout.

El Capitan was the first of Santa Fe's trains to utilize the "Big Dome"-Lounge cars, though these were soon given to the Chief in favor of new double-decker "Hi-Level" coaches developed by Budd and the railroad in 1955. These experimental units featured a quieter ride, increased seating capacities, and boasted better views of the Southwestern terrain El Cap passed through and made this train unique and revolutionary. Amtrak's Superliner equipment, which was placed in service along many of Amtrak's long distance routes, were based on the Santa Fe Hi-Level design. The Superliners were designed to be operated along with older Hi-Level cars.

Eventually the train was combined with the Super Chief and operated under train numbers 17 and 18 through the end of Santa Fe passenger operations. Today the route formerly covered by El Capitan is served by Amtrak's Southwest Chief. Many of Amtrak's trains (especially those in California) consist of a combination of refurbished former Santa Fe Hi-Level cars along with newer Superliner railcar designs. In recent years, four "mothballed" El Capitan lounge cars were removed from storage, refurbished, and placed into service on Amtrak's Coast Starlight as "Pacific Parlour" first-class lounge cars. These refurbished cars feature a service bar, booths, and chairs on the upper level, and a theater on the lower level.

Other O Scale Items: Bachmann O Scale Dual FA1/FA1 Locomotives - Rock Island / Lionel O Scale FT Locomotive - Dummy - Santa Fe / Lionel O Scale 4-6-6-4 Challenger Locomotive - Rio Grande / Lionel O Scale Electric Train Set - B&O - Just In Time For Christmas! / Lionel O Scale Electric Train Set - Rio Grande Flyer- Just In Time For Christmas! / Lionel O Scale Electric Train Set - Polar Express - Just In Time For Christmas!

Other Santa Fe Items: Lionel O Scale FT Locomotive - Dummy - Santa Fe / MTH HO Scale 2-10-0 Russian Decapod Locomotive - Santa Fe / Bachmann HO Scale Rail King Electric Train Set - Santa Fe / Athearn HO Scale EMD GP38-2 Locomotive - Santa Fe / Athearn HO Scale PS-2 Covered Hopper - Santa Fe / Athearn 50ft Ice Reefer Box Car - Santa Fe (Scout) / Athearn HO Scale Cupola Caboose - Santa Fe / Athearn HO Scale GP60M Locomotive - Santa Fe / Athearn Genesis F45 HO Scale Locomotive - Santa Fe / Bachmann 2-10-4 Texas HO Scale Locomotive - Santa Fe / Bachmann 4-8-4 Northern Locomotive - HO Scale - Santa Fe / Proto 2000 Diesel EMD F7A-B Set Powered - HO Scale - Santa Fe / Bachmann HO Scale FT Locomotive - Santa Fe / Walthers HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Santa Fe

Sunday, December 20, 2009

Bachmann O Scale Dual FA1/FA1 Locomotives - Rock Island

Bachmann O Scale Dual FA1/FA1 Locomotives - Rock Island


The ALCO FA was a family of B-B diesel locomotives designed to haul freight trains. The locomotives were built by a partnership of ALCO and GE in Schenectady, New York, between January 1946 and May 1959. They were of a cab unit design, and both cab-equipped lead (A unit) FA and cabless booster (B unit) FB models were built. A dual passenger-freight version, the FPA/FPB, was also offered. It was equipped with a steam generator for heating passenger cars.

Externally, the FA and FB models looked very similar to the ALCO PA models produced in the same period. Both the FA and PA models were styled by GE's Ray Patten. They shared many of the same characteristics both aesthetically and mechanically. It was the locomotive's mechanical qualities (the ALCO 244 V-12 prime mover) and newer locomotive models from both General Motors Electro-Motive Division (EMD) and General Electric (the partnership with ALCO was dissolved in 1953) that ultimately led to the retirement of the locomotive model from revenue service. Several examples of FAs and FBs have been preserved in railroad museums, a few of them in operational status on such lines as the Grand Canyon Railway and the Napa Valley Wine Train.

The Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad (CRI&P RR) (reporting marks RI, ROCK) was a Class I railroad in the United States. It was also known as the Rock Island Line, or, in its final years, The Rock.

Its ancestor, the Rock Island and La Salle Railroad Company, was incorporated in Illinois on February 27, 1847, and an amended charter was approved on February 7, 1851, as the Chicago and Rock Island Railroad. Construction began October 1, 1851, in Chicago, and the first train was operated on October 10, 1852, between Chicago and Joliet. Construction continued on through La Salle, and Rock Island was reached on February 22, 1854, becoming the first railroad to connect Chicago with the Mississippi River.

In Iowa, the C&RI's incorporators created (on February 5, 1853) the Mississippi and Missouri Railroad Company, to run from Davenport to Council Bluffs, and on November 20, 1855, the first train to operate in Iowa steamed from Davenport to Muscatine. The Mississippi river bridge between Rock Island and Davenport was completed on April 22, 1856.

In 1857, Abraham Lincoln represented the Rock Island in an important lawsuit regarding bridges over navigable rivers. The suit had been brought by the owner of a steamboat which was destroyed by fire after running into the Mississippi river bridge. Lincoln argued that not only was the steamboat at fault in striking the bridge but that bridges across navigable rivers were to the advantage of the country.

M&M was acquired by the C&RI on July 9, 1866, to form the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad Company. The railroad expanded through construction and acquisitions in the following decades.

The Rock Island stretched across Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota and Texas. The easternmost reach of the system was Chicago, and the system also reached Memphis, Tennessee; west, it reached Denver, Colorado, and Santa Rosa, New Mexico. Southernmost reaches were to Galveston, Texas, and Eunice, Louisiana while in a northerly direction the Rock Island got as far as Minneapolis, Minnesota. Major lines included Minneapolis to Kansas City, Missouri, via Des Moines, Iowa; St. Louis, Missouri Meta, Missouri, to Santa Rosa via Kansas City; Herington, Kansas, to Galveston, Texas, via Fort Worth, Texas, and Dallas, Texas; and Santa Rosa to Memphis. The heaviest traffic was on the Chicago-to-Rock Island and Rock Island-to-Muscatine lines.

See Other FA1 Locomotives: Trainline HO Scale Alco FA-1 Locomotive - Union Pacific

See Other O Scale Items: Lionel O Scale FT Locomotive - Dummy - Santa Fe / Lionel O Scale 4-6-6-4 Challenger Locomotive - Rio Grande / Lionel O Scale Electric Train Set - B&O - Just In Time For Christmas! / Lionel O Scale Electric Train Set - Rio Grande Flyer- Just In Time For Christmas! / Lionel O Scale Electric Train Set - Polar Express - Just In Time For Christmas!

See Other Rock Island Items: Intermountain Railway Company HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Rock Island / Athearn HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Rock Island / Bachman HO Scale 2-6-0 Mogul Locomotive - Rock Island / Bachmann Spectrum 2-8-0 Consolidation HO Scale Locomotive - Rock Island

Intermountain Railway Company HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Rock Island

Intermountain Railway Company HO Scale Ready To Run FP7A Locomotive - Rock Island


The EMD F7 was a 1,500 horsepower (1,100 kW) Diesel-electric locomotive produced between February 1949 and December 1953 by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors (EMD) and General Motors Diesel (GMD). It succeeded the F3 model in GM-EMD's F-unit sequence, and was replaced in turn by the F9. Final assembly was at GM-EMD's La Grange, Illinois plant or GMD's London, Ontario facility. Although originally promoted as a freight-hauling unit by EMD, the F7 was also used in passenger service hauling such trains as the Santa Fe's El Capitan.

A total of 2,366 cab-equipped lead A-units and 1,483 cabless booster or B-units were built. The F7 was the fourth model in GM-EMD's successful line of F-unit locomotives, and by far the highest-selling cab unit of all time.

Many F7s remained in service for decades, as railroads found them economical to operate and maintain. However the locomotive was not very popular with the yard crews who operated them in switching service because they were difficult to mount and dismount, and it was also nearly impossible for the engineer to see hand signals from his ground crew without leaning way outside the window. As most of these engines were bought and operated before two-way radio became standard on most American railroads, this was a major point of contention. In later years, with the advent of the “GP” type “road switchers”, Fs were primarily used in “through freight” and “unit train” service where there was very little or no switching to be done on line of road.

The F7 can be considered the zenith of the cab unit freight Diesel, as it was ubiquitous on North American railroads until the 1970s (longer in Canada). The F7 design has become entrenched in the popular imagination due to it having been the motive power of some of the most famous trains in North American railroad history.

The F7 replaced the F3, differing primarily in internal equipment (mostly electrical) and some external features. The F7 was eventually succeeded by the more powerful but mechanically similar F9.

The Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad (CRI&P RR) (reporting marks RI, ROCK) was a Class I railroad in the United States. It was also known as the Rock Island Line, or, in its final years, The Rock.

The Rock Island jointly operated the Golden State Limited (Chicago—Kansas City—Tucumcari—El Paso—Los Angeles) with the Southern Pacific Railroad (SP) from 1902–1968. The name was shortened to the Golden State after 1948's modernization. Another joint venture with the SP, the Golden Rocket, was planned to enter service in 1948 but instead became "the train that never was," after SP withdrew from the joint train operating agreement. The Golden Rocket's uniquely-colored livery was placed in Golden State service instead.

In 1937, the Rock Island introduced Diesel power to its passenger service, with the purchase of six lightweight Rocket streamliners.

The railroad operated a number of trains known as Rockets serving the Midwest, including the Rocky Mountain Rocket (Chicago—Omaha—Lincoln—Denver—Colorado Springs), the Corn Belt Rocket (Chicago—Des Moines—Omaha), the Twin Star Rocket (Minneapolis—St. Paul—Des Moines—Kansas City—Oklahoma City—Fort Worth—Dallas—Houston), the Zephyr Rocket (Minneapolis—St. Paul—Burlington—St. Louis) and the Choctaw Rocket (Memphis—Little Rock—Oklahoma City—Amarillo—Tucumcari).

The Rock Island did not join Amtrak on its formation in 1971, and continued to operate its own passenger trains. After concluding that the cost of joining would be the same as operating the two remaining intercity roundtrips (the Chicago-Peoria Peoria Rocket and the Chicago-Rock Island Quad Cities Rocket), the railroad decided to "perform a public service for the state of Illinois" and continue intercity passenger operations. Both trains were discontinued on December 31, 1978.

The Rock Island also operated an extensive commuter train service in the Chicago area. The primary route ran from LaSalle Street Station to Joliet along the main line, and a spur line, known as the "suburban branch" to Blue Island. These services started to receive financial backing in 1976 from the newly formed Regional Transportation Authority. Today these lines are operated as part of Metra, and are known as the Rock Island District.

See Other HO Scale F7 Locomotives: Athearn HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Rock Island / Athearn HO Scale F7A Diesel Locomotive - Burlington Northern / Proto 2000 HO Scale EMD F7A-B Locomotives - Canadian Pacific / Proto 2000 Diesel EMD F7A-B Set Powered - HO Scale - Santa Fe / Walthers HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Santa Fe

See Other Rock Island Items: Athearn HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Rock Island / Bachman HO Scale 2-6-0 Mogul Locomotive - Rock Island / Bachmann Spectrum 2-8-0 Consolidation HO Scale Locomotive - Rock Island

Athearn HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Rock Island

Athearn HO Scale Modernized F7A Locomotive w/DCC & Sound, Rock Island /Frieght #111
Product Features

Researched from the prototype to match specific units
Factory installed onboard sound and DCC decoder
Individual sound boards installed in both A and B units
Genesis driveline with dynamically balanced five pole skew wound motor and dual flywheels
Directional constant lighting


Product Description

Features / / * Researched from the prototype to match specific units / * Factory installed onboard sound and DCC decoder / * Individual sound boards installed in both A and B units / * Genesis driveline with dynamically balanced five pole skew wound motor and dual flywheels / * Directional constant lighting / * Screw mounted chassis / * Individual window 'glass' / * Detailed battery boxes/air tank with brackets / * Detailed 1200-gallon or 1500-gallon fuel tank (as appropriate) / * Partial or complete de-skirting (as appropriate) / * Front and rear lift lugs (as appropriate) / * Front and rear MU hoses, coupler cut levers and air hoses / * Equipped with some or all of the following parts (as appropriate): eyebrow grabs, sunshades & mirrors, cab interior, nose-side ladder grabs, ladder rest grabs and SP snow plow / / Overview / / Athearn Genesis F units are now available in 'modernized' configurations and with an improved / factory installed onboard sound and DCC decoder. / / / / DC Functions: / / / / / / * All sound features are operated by a wireless handheld remote. No additional control box is required to operate advanced sounds. / / * Six-button wireless remote control allows control of the horn, bell, coupler crash,brake / squeal, dynamic brake and brake air release. / / * Additional programmable features allow for different bell and horn tones, coupleron/off, bell rate, directional lights on/off and volume control. / / * Creation of multiple unit lashup with horn, bell and lights on the lead unit only / / / / DCC Functions: / / / / / / * Compatible with all NMRA standard DCC systems / / * Programable for either 2 digit or 4 digit address / / * Programable start voltage / / * Programable acceleration/deceleration rate / / * Programmable top voltage / / * Programmable speed steps / / * Programmable individual unit sound volume / / * Factory equipped

The EMD F7 was a 1,500 horsepower (1,100 kW) Diesel-electric locomotive produced between February 1949 and December 1953 by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors (EMD) and General Motors Diesel (GMD). It succeeded the F3 model in GM-EMD's F-unit sequence, and was replaced in turn by the F9. Final assembly was at GM-EMD's La Grange, Illinois plant or GMD's London, Ontario facility. Although originally promoted as a freight-hauling unit by EMD, the F7 was also used in passenger service hauling such trains as the Santa Fe's El Capitan.

A total of 2,366 cab-equipped lead A-units and 1,483 cabless booster or B-units were built. The F7 was the fourth model in GM-EMD's successful line of F-unit locomotives, and by far the highest-selling cab unit of all time.

Many F7s remained in service for decades, as railroads found them economical to operate and maintain. However the locomotive was not very popular with the yard crews who operated them in switching service because they were difficult to mount and dismount, and it was also nearly impossible for the engineer to see hand signals from his ground crew without leaning way outside the window. As most of these engines were bought and operated before two-way radio became standard on most American railroads, this was a major point of contention. In later years, with the advent of the “GP” type “road switchers”, Fs were primarily used in “through freight” and “unit train” service where there was very little or no switching to be done on line of road.

The F7 can be considered the zenith of the cab unit freight Diesel, as it was ubiquitous on North American railroads until the 1970s (longer in Canada). The F7 design has become entrenched in the popular imagination due to it having been the motive power of some of the most famous trains in North American railroad history.

The F7 replaced the F3, differing primarily in internal equipment (mostly electrical) and some external features. The F7 was eventually succeeded by the more powerful but mechanically similar F9.

See Other HO Scale F7 Locomotives: Athearn HO Scale F7A Diesel Locomotive - Burlington Northern / Proto 2000 HO Scale EMD F7A-B Locomotives - Canadian Pacific / Proto 2000 Diesel EMD F7A-B Set Powered - HO Scale - Santa Fe / Walthers HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Santa Fe

See Other Rock Island Items: Bachman HO Scale 2-6-0 Mogul Locomotive - Rock Island / Bachmann Spectrum 2-8-0 Consolidation HO Scale Locomotive - Rock Island

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

The History Of Burlington Northern Steam Power?

Written By: Ken Hulsey

Any rail fan with even a basic knowledge of railroad history would certainly look at the title of this article and think that I made a mistake.

"Don't you mean 'The History of Burlington Steam Power?'" Would be the obvious question, believing that I was intending to write some long winded piece on the history of the Chicago Burlington & Quincy and their varied forms of steam locomotive power.

That, however, is not the case. I'm indeed writing about Burlington Northern steam power.

Now, before you get some wild ideas, that the CBQ, Northern Pacific and Great Northern some how merged in the 1940s, then split again, or that the BN had some covert steam program in the 70s that no one either knew about or forgot about, let me explain.

Their has been one steam locomotive in the history of railroading that has worn the name "Burlington Northern", though that locomotive actually didn't belong to the BN that came to be after the fore mentioned railroads merged into one.

Are you really curious now? Are you tired of all this 'beating around the bush?'

Okay, I'll come clean.

Almost all of you would certainly recognise Sierra Railroad's 4-6-0 locomotive #3. The old wood burning locomotive has been in hundreds of movies and television shows, including the "Lone Ranger", "Petticoat Junction", "Rawhide", "Death Valley Days", "Lassie", "Gunsmoke", "Bonanza", and "Little House on the Prairie."

Yes, that's right, the 'Hooterville Cannonball".

Indeed, it was this locomotive that once ran under the flag of the Burlington Northern......well on a TV show anyway.

For the 1971 episode of "Gunsmoke" called "The Bullet", the famed #3, was repainted and re lettered with the Burlington Northern name on her tender.

In that episode, the shows main character, Marshall Dillon (played by actor, James Arness) is almost fatally wounded by a black hat wearing outlaw, and has to be transported, by rail, from Dodge City to Denver where there would be a doctor who could save his life.

Now, why exactly, the crew of "Gunsmoke" would opt to name a train traveling from Kansas to Colorado, "Burlington Northern" was never formally explained (and people did ask back in the day) it can only be assumed that some Hollywood type, simply wanted to add 'realism' to the episode and took the time to find out which railroad ran the same route as the train that would be portrayed on screen. Well, in 1971, that would have been the BN.

Being naive to recent railroad mergers, and most certainly, railroad history, whoever it was that decided to go with the BN lettering, probably assumed that the railroad had been around for a hundred years or better.

Little did they know that the railroad, at the time, was only a year into it's existence.

That's just how Hollywood works.

Well let me tell you that after "The Bullet" aired in 1971, CBS received many a letter from confused rail fans, who also let their thoughts be known in the magazines of the day.

Okay, I know what you are thinking, 'a TV show? What? I thought that this was going to be about 'real' BN steam power?'

I get it. I kinda cheated. Their was never any 'real' BN steam locomotives, no green and white painted 4-8-4 'Northerns' with the company's logo on their tenders.

I just thought that it was an interesting bit to throw in on a Wednesday.

Oh, and as a side note. The famed Sierra Locomotive #3 is currently dismantled, and the California Railroad Museum has been raising funds to restore her. Read more about that - HERE

Metrolinx Acquires Full Ownership Of Toronto-Barrie Rail Commuter Corridor

Source: CN (Press Release)

Metrolinx today purchased from CN the lower portion of the Newmarket Subdivision in central-north Toronto for C$68 million. The transaction gives Metrolinx end-to-end ownership of the 60-mile-long Barrie-Bradford GO Train corridor between downtown Toronto and Barrie, Ont. – a first for the government transit agency.

Please visit www.cn.ca/newmarket for a map of the Lower Newmarket Subdivision and CN and GO Transit rail networks in the Toronto area.

Metrolinx is the Ontario government Crown corporation responsible for delivering an integrated, multi-modal transportation network in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), from York and Durham through Toronto, Peel Halton and Hamilton. GO Transit, the operating division of Metrolinx, provides commuter rail and bus services in the GTA.

The Metrolinx line acquisition fills the rail gap between the agency's east-west Union Station Rail Corridor in downtown Toronto, its Weston Subdivision in west-central Toronto, and the northern segment of its commuter rail-line reaching Barrie.

Metrolinx President and Chief Executive Officer J. Robert S. Prichard said: “This transaction marks a milestone for the agency, giving us – for the first time – end-to-end ownership of a GO Transit rail line. This transaction with CN – an important partner of ours -- will permit improvements to service between Toronto and Barrie and points in between. Improved commuter rail and mass transit are vital to easing traffic congestion and air pollution in the GTA, while improving the productivity and economic competitiveness of the region.”

Claude Mongeau, CN executive vice-president and incoming president and chief executive officer, said: “CN is pleased to have reached this sales agreement with Metrolinx. We have close ties with GO – most of its services in the Greater Toronto Area operate over CN's network – and we see our partnership with GO and Metrolinx continuing to drive the environmental benefits of rail in the Toronto region. In addition, this line sale will generate additional value for the company.”

The line acquired by Metrolinx branches off its Weston Subdivision, acquired from CN earlier this year, in west Toronto's Parkdale neighbourhood and runs north past York University to connect with the agency's existing commuter line to Barrie. That line starts immediately north of CN's main east-west freight corridor that parallels Steeles Avenue between Keele and Dufferin streets.

GO currently runs eight commuter trains daily, Monday to Friday, between Toronto and Barrie over the Newmarket Subdivision, which also accommodates a daily CN freight train and VIA Rail Canada Inc.'s transcontinental passenger train three times a week.

Under its sales agreement with Metrolinx, CN will continue to serve five freight customers on the lower Newmarket Subdivision between Highway 401 and CN's main east-west freight corridor.

Rail has a benign environmental footprint, and CN is the green, energy-efficient choice for shippers. Rail has been shown to be up to six times more energy-efficient than heavy trucks, because rail consumes a fraction of the fuel to transport one tonne of freight one kilometre. In fact, we can move one tonne of freight almost 200 kilometres on just one litre of fuel.

The company's innovative Precision Railroading model, and partnership agreements with other railroads to share assets and deliver interchange traffic at the most efficient gateways, have also reduced fuel consumption and emissions.

GO Transit recognizes the decisions we make today will have a major impact on the world we live in tomorrow. Changing attitudes and shifting mindsets are putting the environment at the forefront of GO's plans – both today and in the future. Transit is a clean, sustainable transportation option and GO believes the environment should be a key consideration for future growth strategies and development. Going green is just one of the many ways GO Transit is leading the way, both in the transportation industry and in the eyes of its customers.

See Also: Arbitrator To Decide Wage And Benefit Issues For CN Locomotive Engineers / CN Signs Voluntary Mitigation Agreement With The Village Of Plainfield / CN Locomotive Engineers' Strike To End Immediately After Company And Union Reach Agreement / CN Makes New Offer To Locomotive Engineers' Union In An Effort To End The Strike In Canada / Talks Between CN And Locomotive Engineers' Union In Canada Break Off With No Settlement / CN Receives Strike Notice From Union Representing Locomotive Engineers In Canada / CN To Implement Wage Increase And Milage Cap For It's Canadian Engineers / CN Reaches 20th Voluntary Mitigation Agreement (VMA), Makes Substantial Strides In EJ&E Integration

Model Train Items: Trainline HO Scale EMD GP-9M Locomotive - Canadian National / Bachmann HO Scale 2-6-0 Mogul Locomotive - Canadian National

Bachman HO Scale GP40 Locomotive With Dummy And Caboose - Santa Fe

Bachman HO Scale EMD GP40 Locomotive, Dummy and Caboose - Santa Fe


Product Description

This Santa Fe EMD GP40 Dual Locomotive Set is an HO Scale Model from Bachmann®. Suitable for Ages 8 & Older. FEATURES: Fully assembled with added weight for extra pulling power! The operating diesel locomotive is equipped with a precision can motor, 8-wheel worm gear drive and directional lighting. Each locomotive has a die cast chassis. Separate bearings. Blackened metal RP25 wheels. Body-mounted E-Z Mate® magnetic knuckle couplers. Separately applied handrails. Accurately molded GP40 plastic body shells prototypically painted blue and yellow with crisp pad printing: - Powered: 3518, Santa Fe, logo - Unpowered: 3514, Santa Fe, logo Accurately molded caboose body shell prototypically painted red with crisp yellow print: Santa Fe logo, ATSF 999628. INCLUDES: (1) Powered GP40 (1) Dummy GP40 (1) Caboose SPECS: Scale: HO 1:87 kr9/11/06

An EMD GP40 is a 4-axle diesel locomotive built by General Motors Electro-Motive Division between November 1965 and December 1971. Power was provided by an EMD 645E3 16-cylinder engine which generated 3000 horsepower (2.2 MW).

1,187 examples of this locomotive model were built for American railroads, 16 were built for Canadian railroads, and 18 were built for Mexican railroads. Various passenger versions were also built.

In 1972, the GP40 was discontinued and replaced by the GP40-2, which had an improved electrical system and a few minor exterior cosmetic changes.

Other HO Scale GP40 Locomotives: Athearn HO Scale GP40-2 Locomotive - Southern Pacific

Other Santa Fe Items: Lionel O Scale FT Locomotive - Dummy - Santa Fe /MTH HO Scale 2-10-0 Russian Decapod Locomotive - Santa Fe / Bachmann HO Scale Rail King Electric Train Set - Santa Fe / Athearn HO Scale EMD GP38-2 Locomotive - Santa Fe / Athearn HO Scale PS-2 Covered Hopper - Santa Fe / Athearn 50ft Ice Reefer Box Car - Santa Fe (Scout) / Athearn HO Scale Cupola Caboose - Santa Fe / Athearn HO Scale GP60M Locomotive - Santa Fe / Athearn Genesis F45 HO Scale Locomotive - Santa Fe / Bachmann 2-10-4 Texas HO Scale Locomotive - Santa Fe / Bachmann 4-8-4 Northern Locomotive - HO Scale - Santa Fe / Proto 2000 Diesel EMD F7A-B Set Powered - HO Scale - Santa Fe / Bachmann HO Scale FT Locomotive - Santa Fe / Walthers HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Santa Fe

KCS Announces The Promotion Of Gene M. Goode To Vice President Administration

Source: Kansas City Southern (Press Release)

Kansas City Southern (KCS) and its U.S. subsidiary, The Kansas City Southern Railway Company (KCSR), announced today the promotion of Gene M. Goode from assistant vice president finance to vice president-administration. Mr. Goode will report to executive vice president-corporate affairs Warren K. Erdman.

“Gene has been with KCS for 30 years and is a valuable employee,” said Mr. Erdman. “In his new capacity, he will bring even greater value to our company by managing several important administrative functions that are essential to the company’s daily operations, including real estate, building facilities and U.S. security.”

Mr. Goode joined Kansas City Southern in 1980 and has served in accounting, comptroller and other finance roles for KCS and various subsidiaries during his tenure. Most recently, he was integral to financing the purchases of Kansas City Southern de Mexico, S.A. de C.V. (KCSM) and Panama Canal Railway Company (PCRC), as well as projects related to strategic studies and risk management. Mr. Goode holds a master of business administration in finance and a bachelor of arts in accounting from Avila University.

Headquartered in Kansas City, Mo., KCS is a transportation holding company that has railroad investments in the U.S., Mexico and Panama. Its primary U.S. holding is KCSR, serving the central and south central U.S. Its international holdings include KCSM, serving northeastern and central Mexico and the port cities of Lázaro Cárdenas, Tampico and Veracruz, and a 50 percent interest in PCRC, providing ocean-to-ocean freight and passenger service along the Panama Canal. KCS' North American rail holdings and strategic alliances are primary components of a NAFTA Railway system, linking the commercial and industrial centers of the U.S., Mexico and Canada.

See Also: Railroad Job Postings For December 2009 / Goodwill And Holiday Spirit Run Kansas City Southern’s Ninth Annual Holiday Express / KCS’ Michael Upchurch To Address The Citi 6th Annual Small/Mid Cap Conference

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Lionel O Scale FT Locomotive - Dummy - Santa Fe

Lionel O Scale FT Locomotive - Dummy - Santa Fe

Product Description

This Santa Fe Non-powered FT Diesel features: Die-cast metal trucks, pilot, fuel tank Metal frame Engineer and fireman figures Gauge: Traditional O Gauge Dimensions: Length: 12 3/4? RailLine: Santa Fe Minimum Curve: O-27The Trainz SKU for this item is S11451256. Manufacturer: Lionel Model Number: 28905 Scale/Era: O Modern Model Type: Diesel Loco


The EMD FT was a 1,350-horsepower (1,010 kW) diesel-electric locomotive produced between November 1939, and November 1945, by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division (the "F" stood for "freight" and the "T" for 2,700 horsepower (2,000 kW) with a two-unit set). All told 555 cab-equipped A units were built, along with 541 cabless booster B units, for a grand total of 1,096 units. The locomotives were all sold to customers in the United States. It was the first model in EMD's very successful F-unit series of cab unit freight diesels, and was the locomotive that convinced many U.S. railroads that the diesel-electric freight locomotive was the future. Many rail historians consider the FT one of the most important locomotive models of all time.

FTs were generally marketed as semi-permanently coupled A-B sets (a lead unit and a cabless booster connected by a solid drawbar) making a single locomotive of 2,700 hp (2,000 kW). Many railroads used pairs of these sets back to back to make up a four-unit A-B-B-A locomotive rated at 5,400 hp (4,000 kW). Some railroads purchased semi-permanently coupled A-B-A three-unit sets of 4,050 hp (3,020 kW), while a few, like the Santa Fe, ordered all their FTs with regular couplers on both ends of each unit for added flexibility. All units in a consist could be run from one cab; multiple unit (MU) control systems linked the units together.

Other Lionel O Scale Products: Lionel O Scale 4-6-6-4 Challenger Locomotive - Rio Grande / Lionel O Scale Electric Train Set - B&O - Just In Time For Christmas! / Lionel O Scale Electric Train Set - Rio Grande Flyer- Just In Time For Christmas! / Lionel O Scale Electric Train Set - Polar Express - Just In Time For Christmas!

Other Santa Fe Items: MTH HO Scale 2-10-0 Russian Decapod Locomotive - Santa Fe / Bachmann HO Scale Rail King Electric Train Set - Santa Fe / Athearn HO Scale EMD GP38-2 Locomotive - Santa Fe / Athearn HO Scale PS-2 Covered Hopper - Santa Fe / Athearn 50ft Ice Reefer Box Car - Santa Fe (Scout) / Athearn HO Scale Cupola Caboose - Santa Fe / Athearn HO Scale GP60M Locomotive - Santa Fe / Athearn Genesis F45 HO Scale Locomotive - Santa Fe / Bachmann 2-10-4 Texas HO Scale Locomotive - Santa Fe / Bachmann 4-8-4 Northern Locomotive - HO Scale - Santa Fe / Proto 2000 Diesel EMD F7A-B Set Powered - HO Scale - Santa Fe / Bachmann HO Scale FT Locomotive - Santa Fe / Walthers HO Scale F7 Locomotive - Santa Fe

Lionel O Scale 4-6-6-4 Challenger Locomotive - Rio Grande

Lionel O Scale Lionmaster 4-6-6-4 Challenger Locomotive - D&RGW

Product Features

LEGACY Control System
CrewTalk dialog and TowerCom announcements
Wireless Tether connection between locomotive and tender
Dual powerful maintenance-free motors with momentum flywheels
Authentically detailed cab interior


Product Description

Bringing realism to train enthusiasts like only Lionel can do, the LionMaster Challenger is offered for the first time ever with the LEGACY Control System and LEGACY RailSounds. Beautifully detailed and decorated in the Denver & Rio Grande Western livery, this fully-featured locomotive gives you the opportunity run a classic steam giant on your 0-31 and wider radius track. Close your eyes and blast that RailSounds whistle—it’s easy to imagine that the real Grande Challenger is under your control! For additional railroading realism and excitement we suggest pairing your Challenger with new D&RGW-decorated freight cars. A 40’ flatcar with real wood-deck and an all-new pipe load, and a steam-era double-sheathed boxcar. Whatever you choose to run with this outstanding locomotive, realism has never looked so good on O-31!Gauge: Traditional O Gauge Dimensions: Length: 29" RailLine: Denver & Rio Grande Western Minimum Curve: O-31

The Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad (reporting mark DRGW), generally referred to as the Rio Grande, originally the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad, is a former U.S. railroad, having been absorbed into a larger system — Southern Pacific Transportation Company — as the result of a merger. The D&RGW served mainly as a transcontinental bridge line between Denver, Colorado, and Salt Lake City, Utah, and a major origin of coal and mineral traffic, with a motto of Through the Rockies, not around them. The Rio Grande was the epitome of mountain railroading, operating the highest mainline rail line in the United States, the over 10,240 feet (3,120 m) Tennessee Pass in Colorado, and the famed routes through the Moffat Tunnel and the Royal Gorge. At its height, around 1890, the D&RG had the largest operating narrow gauge railroad network in North America. Known for its independence, the D&RGW operated the last private longhaul passenger train in the United States, the Rio Grande Zephyr.

Other Lionel O Guage Items: Lionel O Scale Electric Train Set - B&O - Just In Time For Christmas! / Lionel O Scale Electric Train Set - Rio Grande Flyer- Just In Time For Christmas! / Lionel O Scale Electric Train Set - Polar Express - Just In Time For Christmas!

Other Rio Grande Items: Bachmann G Scale Electric Train Set - Durango & Silverton / Bachmann On30 Scale Electric Train Set - Rio Grande / Atlas HO Scale TM 70T 3-Bay Open Hopper - Rio Grande / Walthers HO Scale 30' GTW Caboose - Offset Coupla - Rio Grande / Bachmann HO Scale 2-6-2 Prairie Locomotive - Rio Grande / Trainline EMD GP9 HO Scale Locomotive - Rio Grande

Monday, December 14, 2009

Athearn HO Scale SD40-2 Locomotive - Missouri Kansas & Texas

Athearn HO Ready To Run SD40-2 Locomotive with 88" Nose - MKT #629

Product Features

Fully assembled and ready to operate
Upgraded tooling
Separately applied wire grab irons
Separately applied air tanks
Celcon handrails


Product Description

Features / / * Fully assembled and ready to operate / * Upgraded tooling / * Separately applied wire grab irons / * Separately applied air tanks / * Celcon handrails / * DCC ready wiring harness installed / * Prototype specific details applied / * McHenry scale knuckle spring couplers installed / / Overview / / Prototype specific details that may be applied to this model: / / / / / / * Nose length / / * Grilles / / * Fans / / * Battery access doors / / * Exhaust stack / / * Bell / / * Anticlimbers and snowplow / / * Headlights / / * Fuel tank / / * Dynamic brakes / / * Electrical cabinet/Air Filter Box / / * Air Horn / / * Truck sideframes / / Specifications / / DCC: Ready / SOUND: No / PROTOTYPE MANUFACTURER: Electro Motive Division / COUPLER STYLE: McHenry Scale Knuckle / ERA: 1975 - Present / Minimum Age Recommendation: 14 years / Is Assembly Required: No

The Missouri–Kansas–Texas Railroad (reporting mark MKT) was incorporated May 23, 1870. In its earliest days the MKT was commonly referred to as "the K-T", which was its stock exchange symbol; this common designation soon evolved into "the Katy".

The Katy was the first railroad to enter Texas from the north. Eventually the Katy's core system would grow to link Kansas City and St. Louis, Missouri; Tulsa and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Dallas, Fort Worth, Waco, Temple, Austin, San Antonio, Houston, and Galveston, Texas. An additional mainline between Fort Worth and Salina, Kansas, was added in the 1980s after the collapse of the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad; this line was operated as the Oklahoma, Kansas and Texas Railroad

The EMD SD40-2 is a 3,000 horsepower (2,240 kW) diesel-electric locomotive built by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division between January 1972 and February 1986; 3,957 examples were built, and every class 1 railroad in North America has operated this locomotive. Part of the EMD Dash 2 line, the SD40-2 was an upgraded SD40 with modular electronic control systems, HT-C trucks, and many other detail improvements. The SD40-2 is one of the best-selling diesel locomotive models of all time. BNSF, CSXT, Union Pacific and Canadian Pacific operate some of the largest fleets of the type.

The SD40-2 was not the most powerful locomotive type even when introduced; EMD's SD45 and SD45-2 delivered 3,600 hp (2,680 kW), as did GE Transportation Systems' U36B/C and MLW's M636. However, the SD40-2 was significantly more reliable and economical than the higher-powered units, the latter becoming increasingly important with the oil crises of the 1970s.

Just as the SD38, SD39, SD40, and SD45 shared a common frame, so too did the SD38-2, SD40-2, and SD45-2. It was 3 ft (0.91 m) longer than the previous models, giving an overall locomotive length of 68 ft 10 in (20.98 m) over the coupler pulling faces. The SD38-2 and SD40-2 shared the same basic superstructure, since they both used the same 16-645E3 engine (in naturally aspirated and turbocharged form respectively); the long hood was 18 inches (46 cm) longer than the SD38 and SD40, but since the increase in frame length was even greater, the SD38-2 and SD40-2 were left with even larger front and rear "porches" than the earlier models. These empty areas at front and rear are distinctive spotting features to identify the Dash 2 models of both units. The SD40-2 can be distinguished from the SD38-2 by having three roof-mounted radiator fans instead of two. Another distinguishing feature of the SD40-2 as compared to the SD40 is the SD40-2's trucks (HT-C truck), which have shock absorbers on the outside of middle axle. However, this is not true of the former Conrail SD40-2s. After a rash of derailments involving Amtrak SDP40F units that were equipped with HT-C trucks, Conrail ordered the SD40-2 units and several orders of SD50s with the older flexicoil trucks.

As of 2008, some SD45 units have been modified by replacing their 20 cylinder engine with the 16 cylinder removed from otherwise scrapped SD40-2 units. This was common practice for units owned by Union Pacific and possibly other owners. In many cases these are identified by the owner as SD40-2, SD40M-2 or some other such means. Confusion is created when what appears to be an SD45 is labeled as an SD40-2.

Also, some older SD40-2 units used in low-power modes such as yard switching or hump service have been de-turbocharged, resulting in the mechanical equivalent of a SD38-2. Units so modified may or may not be re-labeled.

There are several variations of the SD40-2. Such as the SD40T-2's (T for tunnel motor) bought by fallen flags: Southern Pacific, and Denver and Rio Grande Western; now operated by the Union Pacific Railroad. There is the SD40-2W (W for the 4-Window Safety Cab) bought and operated by the Canadian National railway. There were high-nosed versions of the SD40-2 bought by fallen flags: Norfolk & Western, & Southern Railway. These units are now operated by the Norfolk Southern Railway (Resulting merger of N&W and The Southern Railway). There are even some narrow gauge versions around the world called BB40-2's.

Three cabless SD40-2Bs were also rebuilt from standard SD40-2s by the Burlington Northern Railroad in the early 1980s. The units had been in collisions and it was decided that it would be more economical to rebuild them without cabs. Canadian Pacific also owns a few SD40-2Bs. These were created by welding metal plates over the cab windows of many of its ex-Norfolk Southern and some of its original SD40-2s.

Commuter Railroad, Metrolink, Announces Major Changes

Source: Metrolink (Press Release)

After a closed session personnel discussion amongst the Board of Directors, the Chairman of the Board of the Southern California Regional Rail Authority Keith Millhouse announced that Metrolink CEO David Solow will change his role at the agency effective December 15, 2009.

The Board of Directors and Solow have agreed that he will step down as CEO and for the balance of this fiscal year, until June 30, 2010, he will remain with the agency devoting full time to the interagency collaborations necessary for Metrolink to implement safety enhancements, including Positive Train Control, and interoperability agreements.

“Metrolink has the opportunity to usher in the era of dramatic enhancements in rail travel in this region and in this country, such as Positive Train Control and the addition of High Speed Rail,” said Millhouse. “With Mr. Solow’s expertise focused on interagency collaboration, Metrolink has a unique ability to bring together public and private railroads to improve passenger safety and service in our complex railroad operating environment.”

Mr. Solow's expertise and experience in the interagency operations issues facing commuter rail are widely acknowledged and respected. The Board is appointing him to a new position of "Advisor: Interagency Initiatives," which reports to the Chief Executive Officer. He will be working pursuant to an at will contract through this fiscal year at his current salary.

To lead the agency into this new era of commuter rail, the Board will immediately begin the recruitment of a successor Chief Executive Officer.

In the interim, the Board is fortunate to be able to name as Chief Executive Officer Mr. Eric Haley effective December 15, 2009.

Mr. Haley will be working under an at will contract as Metrolink's Chief Executive Officer until the arrival of a new CEO, but for not more than six months. He brings a wealth of experience to this position from both the public and private sectors and is very familiar with Metrolink and its member agencies based on his experience as the former CEO of the Riverside County Transportation Commission, a Metrolink member agency.

Both Mr. Solow and Mr. Haley are looking forward to working with each other and for Metrolink in their new roles.

“Because I remain dedicated to our top priority of enhancing safety and leading in the development and implementation of new technology, I am pleased to be able to continue this aspect of the work that I have begun,” said Solow. “I look forward to a smooth transition with Eric and the Metrolink team.”

“I would like to thank the Board for this opportunity as a capstone of my career. We face tremendous budget challenges and simultaneously have a plan to continue expansion, which David began,” said Haley. "David's recognized expertise in Positive Train Control will be crucial because safety is the top concern. We are fortunate to have the benefit of David’s experience as Metrolink moves forward with industry leading safety upgrades."

The Board has authorized a two member ad hoc committee to negotiate final contract terms with both Solow and Haley. When final, the contracts will be available on request consistent with the applicable law.

One of Mr. Haley's priorities will be to direct the Board's search for the new CEO to lead Metrolink to being this nation's premier commuter railroad. The Board anticipates hiring a CEO within the first half of 2010. Mr. Haley has agreed that he is not a candidate for the new CEO position.

The Metrolink Board of Directors board took no action on staff recommendations related to potential service cuts or fare increases. Instead, the board approved a motion by L.A. County Supervisor Don Knabe, and seconded by Montclair Mayor Paul Eaton, to not impose a fare increase at this time and to initiate the FY 10-11 budget process in January, 2010. The SCRRA board will reconvene at its regular board meeting on January 8, 2010.

See Also: The Metrolink Holiday Toy Express Delivers Cheer To Antelope Valley & Orange Co / Metrolink Board Postpones Decision On Proposed Fare Increase / Athearn HO Scale F59PHI Locomotive - Metrolink / Athearn HO Scale Bombardier Passenger Cab Car - Metrolink / Athearn HO Scale Bombardier Passenger Coach - Metrolink

Caltrain Holiday Train Collects More Than 4,000 Toys

Source: Caltrain (Press Release)

The holiday season will be brighter for thousands of children thanks to the generosity of people who donated toys during Caltrain’s ninth annual Holiday Train last weekend, Dec. 5 and 6.
In conjunction with the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve’s Toys for Tots program and the Salvation Army, the Caltrain Holiday Train received a total of 4,045 donated toys and books and $2,304 in cash donations from visitors to the stations. Since the first Holiday Train in 2001, approximately 43,755 gifts have been generated for needy Bay Area children.

Working at the San Francisco rail yard at Sixth and Townsend streets, Caltrain staff and volunteers spent weeks decorating the train for this festive tradition.

Thousands of children and adults came out to see the spectacularly lighted train, which visited nine train stations between San Francisco and Santa Clara over the weekend. Kids of all ages got a chance to meet Mr. and Mrs. Claus, Rudolph, Frosty and other holiday characters and enjoy music provided by the San Francisco Corps of the Salvation Army band and on-board choruses.
The Caltrain Holiday Train would not be possible without support for decorations, wiring and costumes from the following sponsors: Linear Technology Corporation, HNTB Corporation, Parsons Brinckerhoff, the Port of San Francisco, Shimmick Construction Company Inc. and Rinat.

The San Mateo County Times, The Daily Journal and Radio Disney are the event’s media sponsors, and in-kind donations are being provided by Peterson Power Systems of San Leandro, Raison D'etre bakery and the San Francisco Caltrain Station Subway.

Amtrak, Caltrain’s contractor operator, and the San Mateo County Transit District also are partners in the event.

See Also: Caltrain Beats Traffic To The KPFA Crafts & Music Fair / Live Entertainment Lights Up Caltrain Holiday Train / Caltrain Gears Up For A Busy Holiday Schedule